Thursday, July 20, 2006

I do not think this means what they think it means.

From Salon.com's "The Fix":

"Tori Spelling's reportedly pregnant with freshly minted husband Dean McDermott. (Life & Style)"

5 comments:

Whit said...

Don't you apply fresh mint to your husband each day?

Kate said...

Well, that, but also--how is she pregnant with her husband? She and her husband are pregnant--fine. She is pregnant with a *baby*, not with her husband.

Anonymous said...

Well, now, I'm not sure it's as clear as all that. The word with can mean several things there. If we said she and her husband are pregant together, it's just acknowledging the male's role in whole process.

What I'm interested in is this machine stamps husbands out of large sheets of some sort of husbandy material.

Kate said...

If they had said that "she and her husband are pregnant together," it would be clear, though. They used a phrasing that certainly grammatically says what they mean, but that most American English speakers would use to imply something else. Think of it this way: if it were not physically impossible for her to be carrying a baby who is also her husband, would there not be a large amount of ambiguity in this sentence? As my father would say (usually after deliberately misinterpreting someone I have said in an annoying but technically correct sort of way) "looseness with language!" (he never finished the thought beyond that, but you get the point).

Man, if I have to explain it this much, it just isn't that funny. Also, though, it may be one of the worst-constructed yet grammatically-correct sentences in history.

Anonymous said...

Same anonymous.

It's actually pretty funny. I'm just being annoying. :)

Besides, c'mon. Husband minters! Picture the Federal Husband Reserve. How would you control husband inflation? Raise the beer rate? Maybe lower it. . .